Birmingham Snow Hill Station slate plaque in Birmingham

Between 1909 - 1914 the "old" station was replaced by Snow Hill in its final form without
interruption to regular services.

G.L. Churchward succeeded William Dean as chief engineer and by 1912 his locomotives like
No 2906 "Lady of Lynn" and the "Saint" and "Star" classes were providing a regular 2 hour express
service from Paddington. Carriages were painted maroon but later reverted to the familiar GWR
chocolate and cream livery.

Larger and more powerful "Castle" and "King" class locomotives were introduced by Charles B.
Collett during the Nineteen Twenties and Thirties. When war came in 1939 Great Westerns familiar
livery was replaced by austerity grey and in 1948 the GWR merged its identity into
British Railways.

Snow Hill continued as part of Western region until 1967 when by order of Parliament it
ceased operation as a main line station.

The mosaic you see here is a miniature of the original work that once dominated St Chad's Circus
by Kenneth Budd and Associates.

The original was 300ft long with varying heights to a maximum of 20ft at the works centre.
It took three years to create and was installed in 1969. The locomotives were 2:3 scale and the
carriages 1:1. The work was made in gold leaf and glass mosaic manufactured by Orsoni in
Venice set around with a light and dark stone aggregate.

The original lettering panels were carved by stonemason Michael Seymour.

The new work by Kenneth's son Oliver Budd is a faithful facsimile of the original design.

www.buddmosaics.co.uk
Between 1909 - 1914 the "old" station was replaced by Snow Hill in its final form without
interruption to regular services.

G.L. Churchward succeeded William Dean as chief engineer and by 1912 his locomotives like
No 2906 "Lady of Lynn" and the "Saint" and "Star" classes were providing a regular 2 hour express
service from Paddington. Carriages were painted maroon but later reverted to the familiar GWR
chocolate and cream livery.

Larger and more powerful "Castle" and "King" class locomotives were introduced by Charles B.
Collett during the Nineteen Twenties and Thirties. When war came in 1939 Great Westerns familiar
livery was replaced by austerity grey and in 1948 the GWR merged its identity into
British Railways.

Snow Hill continued as part of Western region until 1967 when by order of Parliament it
ceased operation as a main line station.

The mosaic you see here is a miniature of the original work that once dominated St Chad's Circus
by Kenneth Budd and Associates.

The original was 300ft long with varying heights to a maximum of 20ft at the works centre.
It took three years to create and was installed in 1969. The locomotives were 2:3 scale and the
carriages 1:1. The work was made in gold leaf and glass mosaic manufactured by Orsoni in
Venice set around with a light and dark stone aggregate.

The original lettering panels were carved by stonemason Michael Seymour.

The new work by Kenneth's son Oliver Budd is a faithful facsimile of the original design.

www.buddmosaics.co.uk
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