Charles Seymour blue plaque in Guildford

Somerset House Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset (1662-1748), was known as the 'Proud Duke'. He would often stay overnight in Guildford when travelling between London and his seat at Petworth. It is said that his irascible nature led him to quarrel with every inn-keeper in the town. Eventually he decided to buy his own house, just outside borough boundary. It is a good example of the contemporary Queen Anne style, with fine brickwork and a gable and entrance steps in the Dutch manner. It was extensively refurbished in 1847, but remained a private house until the 1920s, when shop fronts were knocked through the street frontage on either side of the entrance steps. The upper High Street has had various names in the past, most notably Spital Street. This was short for Hospital Street, and referred to an ancient leper hospital which stood at the junction of the London and Epsom Roads until the 1840s. An alderman's wife, Mrs Quittenton, considered the name improper and in 1901 led a successful campaign to have it changed to 'Upper High Street'. In 1961 it was formally included in the High Street, and all the addresses were renumbered. Across the street, the north side has been almost entirely rebuilt from 1931 onwards, in order to widen the roadway for motor traffic.
Somerset House Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset (1662-1748), was known as the 'Proud Duke'. He would often stay overnight in Guildford when travelling between London and his seat at Petworth. It is said that his irascible nature led him to quarrel with every inn-keeper in the town. Eventually he decided to buy his own house, just outside borough boundary. It is a good example of the contemporary Queen Anne style, with fine brickwork and a gable and entrance steps in the Dutch manner. It was extensively refurbished in 1847, but remained a private house until the 1920s, when shop fronts were knocked through the street frontage on either side of the entrance steps. The upper High Street has had various names in the past, most notably Spital Street. This was short for Hospital Street, and referred to an ancient leper hospital which stood at the junction of the London and Epsom Roads until the 1840s. An alderman's wife, Mrs Quittenton, considered the name improper and in 1901 led a successful campaign to have it changed to 'Upper High Street'. In 1961 it was formally included in the High Street, and all the addresses were renumbered. Across the street, the north side has been almost entirely rebuilt from 1931 onwards, in order to widen the roadway for motor traffic.

Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset (13 August 1662 – 2 December 1748), sometimes referred to as the "Proud Duke", was a British peer. The son of Charles Seymour, 2nd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge, and Elizabeth Alington (1635–1692), he succeeded his brother Francis Seymour, 5th Duke of Somerset, in the dukedom when the latter was shot in 1678. He also inherited the title of Baron Seymour of Trowbridge.Charles was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. In 1682 he married a great heiress, Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Joceline Percy, 11th Earl of Northumberland, who brought him immense estates, including Alnwick Castle, Petworth House, Syon House and Northumberland House in London. In 1683, Somerset received an appointment in the king’s household, and two years later a colonelcy of dragoons; but at the Glorious Revolution he bore arms for the Prince of Orange. Having befriended Princess Anne in 1692, he became a favourite of hers after her accession to the throne, receiving the post of Master of the Horse in 1702. Finding himself neglected by Marlborough, he made friends with the Tories, and succeeded in retaining the queen’s confidence, while his wife replaced the Duchess of Marlborough as Mistress of the Robes in 1711. The Duchess became the Queen's closest confidante, causing Jonathan Swift to direct at her a violent satire, The Windsor Prophecy, in which he accused her of murdering her previous husband, Thomas Thynne. The Duchess retained her influence even after the Queen, following a quarrel, dismissed the Duke as Master of the Horse in 1712.In the memorable crisis when Anne was at the point of death, Somerset acted with Argyll, Shrewsbury and other Whig nobles who, by insisting on their right to be present in the Privy Council, secured the Hanoverian succession to the Crown.He retained the office of Master of the Horse under George I until 1716, when he was dismissed and retired to private life; he died at Petworth on 2 December 1748. The duke’s first wife having died in 1722, he married secondly, in 1726, Charlotte, daughter of the 2nd Earl of Nottingham. He was a remarkably handsome man, and inordinately fond of taking a conspicuous part in court ceremonial; his vanity, which earned him the sobriquet of "the proud duke," was a byword among his contemporaries and was the subject of numerous anecdotes; Macaulay’s description of him as "a man in whom the pride of birth and rank amounted almost to a disease," is well known.The Duke was a founding governor of the Foundling Hospital in London, 1739, the country's first and only children's home for foundlings (abandoned children).

Source: dbpedia

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