Essex Street, Nicholas Barbon, Orlando Bridgeman, Henry Fielding, and 2 others in London

Essex Street was laid out in the grounds of Essex House by Nicholas Barbon in 1675. Among many famous lawyers who lived here were Sir Orlando Bridgeman c.1606-1674 Lord Keeper, Henry Fielding 1707-1754 novelist and Brass Crosby 1725-1793 Lord Mayor of London. James Savage 1779-1852 architect had his office here. Prince Charles Edward Stuart stayed at a house in the street in 1750. Rev Theophilus Lindsey 1723-1808 Unitarian Minister founded Essex Street Chapel here in 1774. Dr. Samuel Johnson established an evening club at the Essex Head in 1783.

Henry Fielding (22 April 1707 – 8 October 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich earthy humour and satirical prowess, and as the author of the novel Tom Jones.Aside from his literary achievements, he has a significant place in the history of law-enforcement, having founded (with his half-brother John) what some have called London's first police force, the Bow Street Runners, using his authority as a magistrate.His younger sister, Sarah, also became a successful writer.

Source: dbpedia

Nicholas If-Jesus-Christ-Had-Not-Died-For-Thee-Thou-Hadst-Been-Damned Barebon who traded as Nicholas Barbon (c. 1640 – c. 1698) was an English economist, physician and financial speculator. He is counted among the critics of mercantilism and was one of the first proponents of the free market. In the aftermath of the Great Fire of London, he also helped to pioneer fire insurance and was a leading player in the reconstruction work—although his buildings were planned and erected primarily for his own financial gain. His unusual middle name, given to him by his strongly Puritan father, is an example of a hortatory name: religious "slogan names" were often given in Puritan families in 17th-century England.

Source: dbpedia

Sir Orlando Bridgeman, 1st Baronet SL (30 January 1606 – 25 June 1674) was an English common law jurist, lawyer, and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1642. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Source: dbpedia

Brass Crosby (8 May 1725 – 1793) was an English radical lawyer, Member of Parliament and Lord Mayor of the City of London.

Source: dbpedia

Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 [O.S. 7 September] – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as "arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history." He is also the subject of "the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature": James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson.Born in Lichfield, Staffordshire, Johnson attended Pembroke College, Oxford for just over a year, before his lack of funds forced him to leave. After working as a teacher he moved to London, where he began to write for The Gentleman's Magazine. His early works include the biography The Life of Richard Savage, the poems "London" and "The Vanity of Human Wishes", and the play Irene.After nine years of work, Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language was published in 1755. It had a far-reaching effect on Modern English and has been described as "one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship." This work brought Johnson popularity and success. Until the completion of the Oxford English Dictionary 150 years later, Johnson's was viewed as the pre-eminent British dictionary. His later works included essays, an influential annotated edition of William Shakespeare's plays, and the widely read tale Rasselas. In 1763, he befriended James Boswell, with whom he later travelled to Scotland; Johnson described their travels in A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland. Towards the end of his life, he produced the massive and influential Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets, a collection of biographies and evaluations of 17th- and 18th-century poets.Johnson was a tall and robust man. His odd gestures and nervous tics were disconcerting to some on first meeting him. Boswell's Life, along with other biographies, documented Johnson's behaviour and mannerisms in such detail that they have informed the posthumous diagnosis of Tourette syndrome, a condition not defined or diagnosed in the 18th century. After a series of illnesses, he died on the evening of 13 December 1784, and was buried in Westminster Abbey. In the years following his death, Johnson began to be recognised as having had a lasting effect on literary criticism, and he was claimed by some to be the only truly great critic of English literature.

Source: dbpedia

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