Flora Murray and Louisa Garrett Anderson grey plaque in London

Site of Endell Street Military Hospital 1915-1919. Established in former workhouse buildings during the First World War under the command of Dr Flora Murray & Dr Louisa Garrett Anderson, this 573-bed hospital is the only British army hospital to have been staffed entirely by women. More than 24,000 soldiers were treated here

Dr. Flora Murray, M.D. (b. 1869 - d. 1923) was a medical pioneer and a member of the Women's Social and Political Union suffragettes.Murray trained at the London School of Medicine for Women and finished her course at Durham. She then worked in Scotland before returning to London in 1905. She was a medical officer at the Belgrave Hospital for Children and then anaesthetist at the Chelsea Hospital for Women.Murray joined the Women's Social and Political Union in 1908, and acted as physician to the militants. She spoke at meetings and rallies, marched in processions, provided first aid at suffragette demonstrations, and looked after Emmeline Pankhurst and other hunger-strikers after their release from prison. She campaigned with other doctors against the forcible feeding of prisoners.In 1912 she founded the Women's Hospital for Children at 688 Harrow Road with Louisa Garrett Anderson. It provided both health care for working-class children of the area, and gave women doctors their only opportunity to gain clinical experience in paediatrics in London; the hospital's motto was Deeds not Words.In the First World War she served in France with the Women's Hospital Corps (WHC). Along with her friend and colleague Dr. Louisa Garrett Anderson, she established military hospitals for the French Army in Paris and Wimereux. Their proposals were at first rejected by the British authorities, but eventually the WHC became established at the military hospital, Endell Street Military Hospital, Holborn, London staffed entirely by women, from chief surgeon to orderlies. Their motto Deeds not Words was used for the second time.She never married and is buried at the Holy Trinity Church with her friend and colleague, Dr. Louisa Garrett Anderson near to their home in Penn, Buckinghamshire. Garrett's tombstone reads "We have been gloriously happy".

Source: dbpedia

Dr. Louisa Garrett Anderson, CBE (28 July 1873 – 15 November 1943) was a medical pioneer, a member of the Women's Social and Political Union, a suffragette, and social reformer. She was the daughter of the founding medical pioneer Elizabeth Garrett Anderson. Her aunt, Dame Millicent Fawcett was a British suffragist. Anderson was the Chief Surgeon of the Women's Hospital Corps (WHC) and a Fellow of Royal Society of MedicineShe was one of the three children of James George Skelton Anderson of the Orient Steamship Company co-owned by his uncle Arthur Anderson, and Elizabeth Garrett Anderson who was the first woman to qualify as a doctor, co-founder of the London School of Medicine for Women and Britain's the first elected woman Mayor (of Aldeburgh).She was educated at St Leonards School in St. Andrews, Fife and at the London School of Medicine for Women located at the Royal Free Hospital, where she worked as a doctor in private practice and hospitals. In 1912, she was imprisoned, briefly, for her suffragette activities. She wrote many medical articles and published a biography of her mother in 1939.[citation needed]In the First World War she served in France with the Women's Hospital Corps. Along with her friend and colleague Dr. Flora Murray, she established military hospitals for the French Army in Paris and Wimereux. Their proposals were at first rejected by the British authorities, but eventually the WHC became established at the military hospital, Endell Street Military Hospital, Holborn, London staffed entirely by women, from chief surgeon to orderlies.[citation needed]

Source: dbpedia

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