Francis Crick and James Watson blue plaque in Cambridge

DNA Double Helix 1953

'The secret of life'. For decades the Eagle was the local pub for scientists from the nearby Cavendish Laboratory. It was here on February 28th 1953 that Francis Crick and James Watson first announced their discovery of how DNA carries genetic information. Unveiled by James Watson 25th April 2003

Francis Harry Compton Crick, OM, FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was an English molecular biologist, biophysicist, and neuroscientist, most noted for being a co-discoverer of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953 with James Watson. He, Watson, and Maurice Wilkins were jointly awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material".Crick was an important theoretical molecular biologist and played a crucial role in research related to revealing the genetic code. He is widely known for use of the term "central dogma" to summarize an idea that genetic information flow in cells is essentially one-way, from DNA to RNA to protein.During the remainder of his career, he held the post of J.W. Kieckhefer Distinguished Research Professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. His later research centered on theoretical neurobiology and attempts to advance the scientific study of human consciousness. He remained in this post until his death; "he was editing a manuscript on his death bed, a scientist until the bitter end" according to Christof Koch.

Source: dbpedia

James Dewey Watson, KBE (hon.), ForMemRS, (born April 6, 1928) is an American molecular biologist, geneticist and zoologist, best known as a co-discoverer of the structure of DNA in 1953 with Francis Crick. Watson, Crick, and Maurice Wilkins were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material".After studies at the University of Chicago (B.S., 1947) and Indiana University (Ph.D., 1950), did postdoctoral research to absorb chemistry with the biochemist Herman Kalckar in Copenhagen, Watson worked at the University of Cambridge's Cavendish Laboratory in England, where he first met his future collaborator and friend Francis Crick.From 1956 to 1976, Watson was on the faculty of the Harvard University Biology Department, promoting research in molecular biology.From 1968 Watson served as director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) on Long Island, New York, greatly expanding its level of funding and research. At CSHL, he shifted his research emphasis to the study of cancer, along with making it a world leading research center in molecular biology. In 1994, he started as president and served for 10 years. He was then appointed chancellor, serving until 2007 when he resigned his position after making controversial comments claiming a link between intelligence and geographical ancestry.Between 1988 and 1992, Watson was associated with the National Institutes of Health, helping to establish the Human Genome Project.Watson has written many science books, including the textbook Molecular Biology of the Gene (1965) and his bestselling book The Double Helix (1968) about the DNA structure discovery, reissued in a new edition in 2012 - The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix edited by Alex Gann and Jan Witkowski.

Source: dbpedia

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