Richard Cobden, John Dalton, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Peel, and 2 others in Manchester

Portico Library - 1806 Thomas Harrison architect (1744-1829) Richard Cobden John Dalton Elizabeth Gaskell Sir Robert Peel Thomas De Quincey Peter Mark Roget were readers here

Thomas Penson De Quincey (/ˈtɒməs də ˈkwɪnsi/; 15 August 1785 – 8 December 1859) was an English essayist, best known for his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821). Many scholars suggest that in publishing this work De Quincey inaugurated the tradition of addiction literature in the West.

Source: dbpedia

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, née Stevenson (29 September 1810 – 12 November 1865), often referred to simply as Mrs Gaskell, was a British novelist and short story writer during the Victorian era. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of the lives of many strata of society, including the very poor, and are of interest to social historians as well as lovers of literature. Gaskell was also the first to write a biography of Charlotte Bronte, The Life of Charlotte Bronte, which was published in 1857.

Source: dbpedia

John Dalton FRS (6 September 1766 – 27 July 1844) was an English chemist, meteorologist and physicist. He is best known for his pioneering work in the development of modern atomic theory, and his research into colour blindness (sometimes referred to as Daltonism, in his honour).

Source: dbpedia

Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was a British Conservative statesman, who served as prime minister of the United Kingdom from 10 December 1834 to 8 April 1835, and also from 30 August 1841 to 29 June 1846. While home secretary, Peel helped create the modern concept of the police force, leading to a new type of officer known as "bobbies" (in England) and "peelers" (in Ireland), his personal namesakes. As prime minister, Peel issued the Tamworth Manifesto (1834) during his brief first period in office, leading to the formation of the Conservative Party out of the shattered Tory Party; in his second administration he repealed the Corn Laws.

Source: dbpedia

Richard Cobden (3 June 1804 – 2 April 1865) was an English manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with two major Free Trade campaigns, the Anti-Corn Law League and the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty.As a young man, Cobden was a successful commercial traveller who became co-owner of a highly profitable calico printing factory in Manchester, a city with which he would become strongly identified. However, he soon found himself more engaged in politics, and his travels convinced him of the virtues of Free Trade (anti-protection) as the key to better international relations.In 1838, he and John Bright founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread at a time when factory-owners were trying to cut wages. As a Member of Parliament from 1841, he fought against opposition from the Peel ministry, and abolition was achieved in 1846.Another Free Trade initiative was the Cobden-Chevalier Treaty of 1860, promoting closer interdependence between Britain and France. This campaign was conducted in collaboration with John Bright and French economist Michel Chevalier, and succeeded despite Parliament’s endemic mistrust of the French.Cobden has been called "the greatest classical-liberal thinker on international affairs" by historian Ralph Raico.

Source: dbpedia

Peter Mark Roget FRS (/roʊˈʒeɪ/; 18 January 1779 – 12 September 1869) was a British physician, natural theologian and lexicographer. He is best known for publishing, in 1852, the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (Roget's Thesaurus), a classified collection of related words.

Source: dbpedia

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