Richard Norman Shaw, Frederick Goodall, and William Schwenck Gilbert blue plaque in London

Sorry, we don't have a photo of this plaque yet.

This house designed by R. Norman Shaw Architect, for Frederick Goodall Painter was later the home of W. S. Gilbert Writer and librettist

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836 – 29 May 1911) was an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas (known as the Savoy operas) produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. The most famous of these include H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and one of the most frequently performed works in the history of musical theatre, The Mikado. These, as well as several of the other Savoy operas, continue to be frequently performed in the English-speaking world and beyond by opera companies, repertory companies, schools and community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "short, sharp shock", "What, never? Well, hardly ever!", and "Let the punishment fit the crime".Gilbert also wrote the Bab Ballads, an extensive collection of light verse accompanied by his own comical drawings. His creative output included over 75 plays and libretti, numerous stories, poems, lyrics and various other comic and serious pieces. His plays and realistic style of stage direction inspired other dramatists, including Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. According to The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Gilbert's "lyrical facility and his mastery of metre raised the poetical quality of comic opera to a position that it had never reached before and has not reached since".

Source: dbpedia

Richard Norman Shaw RA (7 May 1831 – 17 November 1912), was a British architect who worked from the 1870s to the 1900s, known for his country houses and for commercial buildings.

Source: dbpedia

Frederick Goodall RA (London March 17, 1822 – July 29, 1904) was an English artist.Goodall was born in 1822, the second son of steel line engraver Edward Goodall (1795–1870). He received his education at the Wellington Road Academy.Frederick's first commission, for Isambard Brunel, was six watercolour paintings of the Rotherhithe Tunnel. Four of these were exhibited at the Royal Academy when Frederick was 16. His first oil won a Society of Arts silver medal. He exhibited work at the Royal Academy 27 times between 1838 and 1859. He was elected Associate of the Royal Academy in 1852.Goodall visited Egypt in 1858 and again in 1870, both times travelling and camping with Bedouin tribesmen. In order to provide authentic detail to his paintings, Goodall brought back sheep and goats from Egypt. The Eyptian theme was prominent in his work, with 170 paintings being exhibited at the Royal Academy over 46 years.Goodall's work received high praise and acclaim from critics and artists alike and he earned a fortune from his paintings. He had a home built at Grim's Dyke, Harrow Weald, where he would entertain elaborate guests such as the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII). Frederick's brother, Edward Angelo Goodall (1819–1908) was also a highly gifted artist who exhibited at the RA from 1846 to 1853. A specialist in watercolours, he was invited to join the RWS (Royal Watercolour Society) in 1856 and exhibited 328 pictures at its exhibitions. It was Edward who had the distressing task of arranging the sale of his brother's pictures and effects when he was declared bankrupt in 1902. His other brother Walter Goodall was also a notable watercolour artist.

Source: dbpedia

Local area map loading...
All plaques in Harrow

Tell us what you know about Richard Norman Shaw, Frederick Goodall, and William Schwenck Gilbert blue plaque in London

BluePlaquePlaces.co.uk is a Good Stuff website.