Trentham Hall, Cromartie Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Charles Barry, and 6 others in Stoke-on-Trent

This memorial stone erected by Cromartie, Fourth Duke of Sutherland, A.D. 1913 marks the site of Trentham Hall, and of the following incidents connected with this place. In the Seventh Century Trentham formed part of the Demesne surrounding the residence at Bury Bank of Wulphure, King of Mercia. During the reign of Wulphure A.D. 659 - 674 one of the first Christian churches of Staffordshire was erected here by St Werburgh, the daughter of the King. St Werburgh also added a nunnery. At the conquest in A.D. 1066 King William I resumedpossession of the Royal Demesne of Wulphure, and afterwards granted part of it as a manor to the Earls of Chester who
before A.D. 1150 replaced the early church and nunnery of St Werburgh with a new church and a priory. At the reformation King Henry VIII again exercised his right to the ancient Royal Manor and although the priory was dissolved the church was preserved and it remained unaltered until re-built by George Granville 2nd Duke of Sutherland A.D. 1843 from a design by Sir Charles Barry, R.A. The original pillars of the nave of the Norman church were carefully preserved and restored on their ancient site. After the suppression of the priory A.D. 1538 the King sold the property in 1539 to the Duke of Suffolk and it was afterwards purchased
by James Leveson in 1540. And the first Trentham Hall was either formed out of the old priory buildings or built on their site. An ancient plan dated 1599 shows it under the name of Manor of Trentham, and this was the residence occupied by Admiral Sir Richard Leveson for some years before his death in 1605. In A.D. 1634 a new hall in the Elizabethan style of architecture was erected on the site of the ancient priory by Sir Richard Leveson. K.B. In A.D 1690 the Elizabethan house was removed and the third Trentham Hall was built by Sir William Leveson Gower Baronet. This hall was much altered and enlarged by the first Marquis of Stafford, and the first Duke of Sutherland, until 1834, when it was re-constructed by the 2nd Duke of Sutherland in the Italian style from designs by Sir Charles Barry R.A. After the closing of Trentham Hall as a residence in 1905 it was offered for purposes of Higher Education.
(1st) To the County Council of Staffordshire.
(2nd) To the Mayor and Council of the Federated Borough of Stoke-on-Trent.
But acceptance failing, the house was removed.
This memorial stone erected by Cromartie, Fourth Duke of Sutherland, A.D. 1913 marks the site of Trentham Hall, and of the following incidents connected with this place. In the Seventh Century Trentham formed part of the Demesne surrounding the residence at Bury Bank of Wulphure, King of Mercia. During the reign of Wulphure A.D. 659 - 674 one of the first Christian churches of Staffordshire was erected here by St Werburgh, the daughter of the King. St Werburgh also added a nunnery. At the conquest in A.D. 1066 King William I resumedpossession of the Royal Demesne of Wulphure, and afterwards granted part of it as a manor to the Earls of Chester who
before A.D. 1150 replaced the early church and nunnery of St Werburgh with a new church and a priory. At the reformation King Henry VIII again exercised his right to the ancient Royal Manor and although the priory was dissolved the church was preserved and it remained unaltered until re-built by George Granville 2nd Duke of Sutherland A.D. 1843 from a design by Sir Charles Barry, R.A. The original pillars of the nave of the Norman church were carefully preserved and restored on their ancient site. After the suppression of the priory A.D. 1538 the King sold the property in 1539 to the Duke of Suffolk and it was afterwards purchased
by James Leveson in 1540. And the first Trentham Hall was either formed out of the old priory buildings or built on their site. An ancient plan dated 1599 shows it under the name of Manor of Trentham, and this was the residence occupied by Admiral Sir Richard Leveson for some years before his death in 1605. In A.D. 1634 a new hall in the Elizabethan style of architecture was erected on the site of the ancient priory by Sir Richard Leveson. K.B. In A.D 1690 the Elizabethan house was removed and the third Trentham Hall was built by Sir William Leveson Gower Baronet. This hall was much altered and enlarged by the first Marquis of Stafford, and the first Duke of Sutherland, until 1834, when it was re-constructed by the 2nd Duke of Sutherland in the Italian style from designs by Sir Charles Barry R.A. After the closing of Trentham Hall as a residence in 1905 it was offered for purposes of Higher Education.
(1st) To the County Council of Staffordshire.
(2nd) To the Mayor and Council of the Federated Borough of Stoke-on-Trent.
But acceptance failing, the house was removed.

Sir Charles Barry FRS (23 May 1795 – 12 May 1860) was an English architect, best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster (also known as the Houses of Parliament) in London during the mid-19th century, but also responsible for numerous other buildings and gardens. He is known for his major contribution to the use of Italianate architecture in Britain, especially the use of the Palazzo as basis for the design of country houses, city mansions and public buildings. He also developed the Italian Renaissance garden style for the many gardens he designed around country houses.

Source: dbpedia

Trentham Gardens are formal Italianate gardens, part of an English landscape park on the Trentham Estate in Trentham, Staffordshire. The site is located on the southern fringe of the city of Stoke-on-Trent, England. The site was also the location of the former Trentham Hall of which fragments survive.

Source: dbpedia

Cromartie Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 4th Duke of Sutherland (20 July 1851– 27 June 1913), KG, styled Lord Cromartie Sutherland-Leveson-Gower until 1858, Earl Gower between 1858 and 1861 and Marquess of Stafford between 1861 and 1892, was a British peer and politician.

Source: dbpedia

George Granville Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 2nd Duke of Sutherland KG (8 August 1786 – 22 February 1861), styled Viscount Trentham until 1803, Earl Gower between 1803 and 1833 and Marquess of Stafford in 1833, was a British peer, who had been a Whig M.P..

Source: dbpedia

Sir Richard Leveson (1598–1661) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1642. He supported the Royalist cause during the English Civil War. Leveson was the second son of Sir John Leveson of Halling, Kent, and his second wife Christian Mildmay, daughter of Sir Walter Mildmay. In 1605 he inherited property in Trentham, Staffordshire and Lilleshall, Shropshire from his father’s cousin Sir Richard Leveson, Vice-Admiral of England. Leveson's elder brother, John, who was intended to inherit his father's estates, died in 1612, three years before his father. Leveson therefore inherited his father’s estates in Kent as well as the Vice-Admiral’s estates. He rebuilt the family seat at Trentham Hall between 1630 and 1638 at a cost of over £6000.In November 1640, Leveson was elected Member of Parliament for Newcastle under Lyme in the Long Parliament. He encouraged Royalist support in Staffordshire and was disabled from sitting in parliament on 24 November 1642 for raising forces against parliament. In 1645 Lilleshall Abbey fell to the parliamentary army and Leveson was imprisoned at the Parliamentary garrison in Nantwich.Leveson married Katherine Dudley, daughter of Sir Robert Dudley, but had no children. His co-heiresses were the two daughters of his elder brother John. One of them, Christian, married Sir Peter Temple of Stowe. A portrait of this Sir Richard Leveson seems to have found its way into the collection of paintings at Stowe House, Buckingham. A portrait of Sir Richard Leveson, said to be by Vandyck, belonged to the Duke of Sutherland in 1891. This portrait was purchased for £65 02s 00d from the sale of the possessions of the Dukes of Buckingham and Chandos held at Stowe House in 1848. It was described in the sale catalogue as by Van Dyck (whereas other paintings are described as 'after Van Dyck' or a 'copy of Van Dyck'). The catalogue records that Sir Richard is shown ‘in a black dress, with a frill’and that the painting was ‘bought ‘after a very active competition.’

Source: dbpedia

Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet (c. 1647–22 December 1691) was an English politician.Born William Gower, he was the second son of Sir Thomas Gower, 2nd Baronet and Frances, daughter and coheir of John Leveson. He added the surname Leveson to his own in 1668, when he inherited the Trentham and Lilleshall estates of his maternal great-uncle, Sir Richard Leveson. Leveson-Gower married Lady Jane Granville (the eldest daughter of the 1st Earl of Bath) and they had five children:Katherine (1670–?), who married Sir Edward Wyndham, 2nd Baronet,John, later 1st Baron Gower (1675–1709).Jane (d. 1725), who married the 4th Earl of Clarendon).Richard (died unmarried)William (died unmarried), Member of Parliament for Ludlow 1698-9 and 1701.Leveson-Gower inherited his childless nephew's baronetcy in 1689 and on his own death two years later, was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, John.

Source: dbpedia

Werburh or Wærburh (also known as Werburgh and Werburga) (d. 3 February 699 at Trentham) was an Anglo-Saxon princess who became an English saint and the patron saint of Chester. Her feast day is February 3.

Source: dbpedia

Wulfhere or Wulfar (died 675) was King of Mercia from 658 until 675 AD. He was the first Christian king of all of Mercia, though it is not known when or how he converted from Anglo-Saxon paganism. His accession marked the end of Oswiu of Northumbria's overlordship of southern England, and Wulfhere extended his influence over much of that region. His campaigns against the West Saxons led to Mercian control of much of the Thames valley. He conquered the Isle of Wight and the Meon valley and gave them to King Æthelwealh of the South Saxons. He also had influence in Surrey, Essex, and Kent. He married Eormenhild, the daughter of King Eorcenberht of Kent.Wulfhere's father, Penda, was killed in 655 at the Battle of Winwaed, fighting against Oswiu of Northumbria. Penda's son Peada became king under Oswiu's overlordship but was murdered a year later. Wulfhere came to the throne when Mercian nobles organized a revolt against Northumbrian rule in 658 and drove out Oswiu's governors.By 670, when Oswiu died, Wulfhere was the most powerful king in southern Britain. He was effectively the overlord of Britain south of the Humber from the early 660s, although not overlord of Northumbria as his father had been. In 674, he challenged Oswiu's son Ecgfrith of Northumbria, but was defeated. He died, probably of disease, in 675. Wulfhere was succeeded as King of Mercia by his brother, Æthelred. Stephen of Ripon's Life of Wilfrid describes Wulfhere as "a man of proud mind, and insatiable will".

Source: dbpedia

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