Virginia Woolf, Clive Bell, Lytton Strachey, Alix Strachey, and 1 other in London

Here and
in neighbouring
houses during
the first half of
the 20th Century
there lived several
members of the
Bloomsbury Group
including
Virginia Woolf
Clive Bell and
the Stracheys

Adeline Virginia Woolf (/ˈwʊlf/; nee Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century.During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction." Woolf suffered from severe bouts of mental illness throughout her life, thought to have been the result of what is now termed bipolar disorder, and committed suicide by drowning in 1941 at the age of 59.

Source: dbpedia

Giles Lytton Strachey (/ˈdʒaɪlz ˈlɪtən ˈstreɪtʃi/; 1 March 1880 – 21 January 1932) was a British writer and critic.A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group and author of Eminent Victorians, he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which psychological insight and sympathy are combined with irreverence and wit. His biography Queen Victoria (1921) was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

Source: dbpedia

Arthur Clive Heward Bell (16 September 1881 – 18 September 1964), generally known as Clive Bell, was an English Art critic, associated with formalism and the Bloomsbury Group.

Source: dbpedia

Alix Strachey (4 June 1892 – 28 April 1973), née Sargant-Florence, was an American-born British psychoanalyst and with her husband the translator into English of the works of Sigmund Freud.Strachey was born in Nutley, New Jersey, USA, the daughter of Henry Smyth Florence, an American musician, and Mary Sargant Florence, a British painter. Her elder brother, Philip Sargant Florence, later became a noted economist and married the pioneer birth control activist Lella Faye Secor. Alix was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, Cambridge, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.Freud asked the couple to translate some of his works into English, and this was to become their lives' work. Both became psychoanalysts themselves, and as well as Freud's works also translated works by a number of other European psychoanalysts. Their translations remain the standard editions of Freud's works to this day.

Source: dbpedia

James Beaumont Strachey (26 September 1887, London – 25 April 1967, High Wycombe) was a British psychoanalyst, and, with his wife Alix, a translator of Sigmund Freud into English. He is perhaps best known as the general editor of the “Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud ... the international authority”.

Source: dbpedia

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